Blog Archives

We Sell the Ultimate Commodity – Money

venture-capital-adLast week I participated in a panel discussion at Denver University organized by Maclyn (Mac) Clouse. Mac is a long-time educator and supporter Denver’s entrepreneurial community. I was joined by Peter Adams, Executive Director of the Rockies Venture Club. Mac’s setup for the discussion was “dangerous” because he offered both Peter and I the opportunity to speak for 15 minutes (thankfully without slides) about the angel, venture capital and growth equity investing landscape. No-one who knows me would ever give me that air time…

Peter led off and did an great job talking about the angel investing landscape and the do’s and don’ts of approaching angel investors. Peter is the co-author of Venture Capital

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Growth Equity, Lessons Learned, Raising Capital, Venture Capital

Founder Liquidity and Growth Equity

Founder LiquidityI’m seeing more and more growth equity financings come to market with an over-sized component of the financing allocated to existing shareholder liquidity. I’ve seen enough of these transactions to consider it as a trend and to wonder what is motivating it.

Founder Liquidity in Context

Whereas liquidity isn’t typically a feature of venture financings, it is  often – but not always – a feature of growth equity financings. A modicum of liquidity for key management team members or founders can act as lubricant for a growth equity investment, particularly where the management team founded and has successfully bootstrapped a successful business.

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Growth Equity, Raising Capital, Risk, Venture Capital

Finding harmony between advice and self-interest

advice and self-interestI just wrapped one of those calls where I had the opportunity to give advice to an entrepreneur that runs counter to my short-term interests. In this case, it is a story of a first-time entrepreneur who has built a $7 million revenue business and is wrestling with the decision whether to take growth capital or sell the business. He owns the vast majority of the company and he has a fair offer from a strategic buyer that emerged during the course of his exploring financing alternatives.

After meeting yesterday (our third meeting or so), I committed to outlining how a growth equity investor would structure an investment transaction for his business.

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Growth Equity, Lessons Learned

What is an entrepreneur to do when restrictive covenants become restrictive

Restrictive Covenants - HandcuffsRestrictive covenants are standard features of venture capital, growth equity and private equity transactions although each investor type has its own standards. Restrictive covenants are the actions a company cannot take without investor approval. A short list of typical restrictive covenants includes:

Tagged with:
Posted in Growth Equity, Lessons Learned, Venture Capital, Working with Invesors

Basics of Unit Economics Analysis

When an investment passes our first-screen at Meritage Funds, the first deep-dive we typically do is on the unit economics of the business. Unit economics are the fundamental financial building blocks of a business. If you can pin down the unit economics, you can determine contribution margins, break-even points and perform ROI calculations all of which can help to determine whether a Company’s economic engine works. Without an understanding of unit economics, predicting whether a business can be profitable in the long-term is all guess-work.

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Economics, Growth Equity, Investment Selection, Raising Capital
Derek Pilling

About Derek

I'm a Managing Director with Meritage Funds, a growth equity investment firm based in Denver, CO. I've been working with growth stage businesses my entire career. When I'm not working, I ski, spin, coach youth sports and spend time with my beautiful wife and three kids.

I blog because the process helps me crystalize how I frame the world. I want to hear what you think. Please comment.

Twitter feed

Colorado - Entrepreneurial by Nature

Categories